What’s in a word? ~ Dictionary Day

Welcome to the very first ‘Dictionary Day’ πŸ€—

Honestly, I can’t tell you where this idea came from. A few days ago, I, all of a sudden, had the image of my beautiful dictionary in my mind, and the thought of taking a word and seeing what all is ‘in it’.

This is my dictionary…pretty, isn’t it?

image

Looking at it, I always have to think of ‘Hawkeye’ Pierce from M*A*S*H. He was being interviewed by a stateside reporter visiting Korea. The reporter asked him which books he brought to Korea….Hawkeye’s answer was “Just the dictionary. I figure it has all other books in it” πŸ€“

Alright then, let’s see ~ today’s word is

                                                                          ABALONE

~1. Here’s what the dictionary has to say about it

image

Wikipedia says – ‘any of a group of small to very large sea snails, marine gastropod Mollusks in the family Haliotidae’. Other common names are ear shells, sea ears, and muttonfish.
Abalone is used for food, the shell for ornaments, and is a source of ‘Mother-of-
Pearl’.

~2. Pictures!

The shells….

Here’s one in a tank …

image

~3.  Viral Bhanshaly wrote a poem about the Abalone

Abalone Shell
As the Abalone Shell was found,
All the architects’ gathered round,
Gazing at the piece of art,
Made by a creature, so serene and smart.

Its natural beauty made no noise,
For all the architects’, were there and poised,
Staring, at this new found wonder,
Slowly, they started to plunder…

What made such a beautiful work?
Why is it making, our minds go berserk?
What produced the velvety curl?
What in such nature produced this twirl?

And so they held it in their hands,
As the first tears, came down in bands,
The golden, bluely, greenly shades,
Bold still, over many decades.

With the patterned indents still there,
Their hearts clear of all despair,
They carried on still surprised,
Until they slowly realised.

The little mark, precise and secure,
As it acted like a little lure,
For in the middle a little eye,
Pointing to, the Heavens and sky.

With all the shininess, that it brought,
The Abalone Shell purely sought,
Out of all its twists and bends,
That before it had, many friends.

And ten indents it carried inside,
These may be friends, or rules to abide,
And in the gold, it may be so true,
That it lived with its friends, like a fine crew.

The bluely-green may signify sea,
Also the Abalone was fine, well and free,
But in all of this, the thing that was best,
Was inside the eye, a red golden crest.

This was the heart, serene, filled with grace,
It pumped the, unique creature, at a good pace,
And as a good present, it then left behind,
The Abalone Shell, which we, today find.

The heart may be gone, taken up above,
Up to the skies, with the white dove,
But, we keep, the blue, green and golden,
Abalone Shell, however much, past olden.

We now today, remember this deed,
The Abalone Shell, which we also freed,
Nobody knows, where those men went,
But with them, discovery, whether given or meant…

Viraj Bhanshaly

~4. And  it’s also mentioned in song lyrics

~ Top of the hill by Tom Waits

~ My Belly by Aesop Rock

~ Thanks To The Rolling Sea by Elvis Presley…..hehe- πŸ•Ί- this is the emoji you get when you type ‘Elvis’! πŸ˜„ Sorry- I had to share.

~5. Do you know the game ‘Abalone’? I’m not sure what that has to do with things…yet, there it is. πŸ€” Maybe the original game idea is older, and it used to be played with shells? What do you think? Any idea?

~6. There’s also a wine grape called Abalone. It’s widely known as ‘Chasselas blanc’ grown in Switzerland, France, Germany, Portugal, Hungary, Romania, and New Zealand. Wow….it’s seems that’s a very popular grape. 😁

Well, I do believe that’s all. I had fun researching for- and writing this. I hope you enjoyed reading it. 😊

See you soon! πŸ’•

Until then
~ Tina xoxo

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Hannah (BitterSweet)
    Mar 10, 2017 @ 16:34:59

    Isn’t the English language fascinating? I loved this deep dive on a word I had previously given little consideration to. Bring on more dictionary days! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply

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